Smoky Sweet Potato Hash with Kale and Black Beans

So, I literally just realized that I am writing another post about sweet potatoes. Seriously? Good thing they are quite versatile.

Sweet Potato 8

And also, kale? Kale is the trend when it comes to health food these days, and I can totally see why. Kale has more iron than beef {that’s awesome news for those with deficiencies}, more calcium than a glass of milk, and significantly more vitamin C than spinach, among many other things.

Purple Kale

Kale, for me, is better cooked. Don’t get me wrong, I’ll eat it raw, but I prefer it cooked, and this combination is not only a huge handful of many super foods, but also freakin’ delicious. Plus, it’s a one-pot meal, perfect for those lazier days.

Purple Kale1

| Smoky Sweet Potato Hash with Kale and Black Beans

serves 2-3

1 TBS olive oil

1 large sweet potato, chopped into very small pieces

1/4 red onion, chopped

7 oz black beans {half a can} drained and rinsed

3 large Kale leaves, cut into thin ribbons

a dash of salt

a dash of cayene

1/2 TSP smoky paprika

In a large skillet on medium-high heat, cook in an even layer the sweet potatoes, covering. Stir every couple of minutes for about 15 minutes total.

Add in the chopped onion and continue cooking for a couple more minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the beans with the spices, again in an even layer after being well incorporated, and cover for another couple of minutes, stirring occasionally.

When everything is nice and somewhat crispy, add in the ribbons of kale, and cook until just wilted.

sweet potato 12



Stuffed Sweet Potatoes

So, this recipe is a little redundant considering it has many of the same main components of the last post, but hey, you work with what ya got.

Over the past several months I have been mildly… wait, no… over-the-top-obsessed with sweet potatoes. I probably eat one about 5 times a week. I have been eating them plain with the teeniest amount of sea salt, and can’t get enough.

After I saw this sweet lady’s post about her obsession with the root and how she’s been eating them, I decided to try some new things. This recipe was just what I felt like adding at the time, but if you make these, you should add whatever you have in your fridge, or whatever sounds good to you. Garbanzos, turnip greens, collard greens, parsley, cilantro, kidney beans… you get the picture.

Stuffed Sweet Potato5

| Stuffed Sweet Potatoes

Serves 1

1 medium sweet potato

a handful of kale, torn into bits

a handful of baby spinach

a couple TBS black beans

a couple TBS white beans

nonstick spray

a pinch of sea salt

Bake your sweet potato for one hour in a 350 degree oven.

A few minutes before the sweet potato is finished, saute the greens on medium heat with nonstick spray until wilted. When the potato is finished and slightly cooled, cut it open lengthwise. Stuff it with the greens, and top it off with the beans. Sprinkle with a little sea salt and lunch is served!

Stuffed Sweet Potato


Quinoa with Greens & Beans

Over the last few years, I have really stayed away from carbohydrates. Even getting as far as being overly obsessive about not eating fruit or even veggies that had over a few grams in them before my wedding. I thought this was “healthy” because, yeah, I lost a lot of weight. But I gained it all back pretty much immediately after our honeymoon. I hadn’t even introduced carbs back into my diet yet, but I made up for it because when I had a cheat day, I really had a cheat day.

I have discovered over countless diets and trial and error that all your body really needs is balance. If it doesn’t get this balance, your body gets cravings and sooner or later you will indulge those cravings. I have only recently {like 2 weeks ago} come to terms with the fact that eating carbs not on the weekend is actually okay {gasp!}. And I don’t mean white sugar and white flour. I mean whole grain seed carbohydrates {notice I didn’t say whole wheat}. Carbs are still a little scary to me, but I have read The Kind Diet before and recently picked it up again, and it details so well why we need these little seedlings in our life and what they do for our insides and overall well-being.

Quinoa with Greens and Beans

So here’s to carbs! {Wow, never thought I’d say that}


| Quinoa with Greens & Beans

Serves 2

1 C quinoa

1 TSP oil {I used coconut}

4 or 5 baby bella mushrooms

1/2 C chopped onion

1 C spinach

1 C kale, torn into pieces

1 TSP soy sauce

1/2 C canned great northern beans, or any white bean

Cook the quinoa as package directs {you will have extra}.

In a skillet on medium-high heat, lightly saute the mushrooms and onions in coconut oil until soft. Add the kale and spinach plus soy sauce and 1 TSP water. Cover and stir every few minutes until the greens have wilted.

Start your plate with about a quarter of the quinoa in the pan {or however much you want}, then make a little bed of half of the vegetables and sprinkle 1/2 the beans over the top.

Quinoa with Greens and Beans1


Soup in Summer? Oh, yes I did!

I don’t know why, but every summer, I have this deranged, insatiable need to create a soup.


Yeah, weird, I know. But this is what I’ve come to terms with: I think that the hidden sanity beneath all of this oxymoron-esque foolishness is because it’s easy – you don’t need 3 pans on 3 burners; just one. Contrary to what one might think, it actually keeps the house cooler. Very important when you’re living in an unairconditioned house. Yes. Very important.

This happened to me last summer, too. I repeatedly made chili, adding to the dumbfounded-ness of my then almost-husband. Honestly, I don’t blame him. Who would want to eat hot, spicy chili in 100 degree weather {although some Asian cultures believe that if you’re cold, drink cold beverages, and if you’re hot, hot beverages to balance the body temperature. Could they be right?}?

However, I think this soup I am about to acquaint you with might actually make you think that soup during summer is a sensational idea! Very fresh, clean and light, this soup is, making up for it’s lack in coolness. I was inspired to make this soup by my parents’ best friends who, every year, as far back as I can remember, they had us over for dinner on New Years Day and we had this Portuguese soup. I don’t know their exact recipe, but I tried my hand at it…

What you’ll need:

14 oz or 1 Package of Polska Kielbasa

1 Head of Kale {shall we go into the health benefits of this one? It would be a long conversation}

1 – 15 oz Can of Cannellini Beans, drained { they are really the same as great northerns, so if you have those, use them – however, great northerns do have less impressive nutritional values. Trust me – I studied the two cans in the grocery store aisle for 5 minutes, while people stared}.

1 – 15 oz Can of Kidney Beans

1 – 10 oz Can of Medium Heat Rotel Diced Tomatoes {can you tell I like this stuff?}

1/2 of a Red Onion, diced

1 C of Mushrooms, quartered, stems cut off

12 C of Water

S&P to taste

Put those 12 cups of water plus that can of Rotel {do not drain}  in a very large, deep pot on High, to get it boiling. While you’re waiting, chop that Kale coarsely, and add to the water. Slice up those Kielbasa links, and also add.

Drain & rinse well, both the cans of beans. Toss those in the pan, after the kale has begun wilting, along with the quartered mushrooms and diced onions. Once everything has mingled nicely, liberally S&P to taste {trust when I say liberally – there is, after all, 12 cups of water in there}. Close that sucker up with a lid.

Bring the heat to a simmer for an hour to an hour and a half.

You remember this recipe from last week? Here’s where it comes in handy with that toast. Make the toast according to instructions, dip in this ambrosial soup, and let your taste buds cheer. And they won’t even know how good it is for you. Sometimes I feel like my taste buds are kids – as soon as they know it’s healthy, they don’t want anymore! Okay, that’s a lie. But it’s that good! Try to trick your tongue!

Shhhh! It’s our secret ;).


*Statistics are approximate and can be calculated on

  8 Servings
Amount Per Serving
  Calories 264.2
  Total Fat 14.4 g
  Saturated Fat 5.0 g
  Polyunsaturated Fat 1.8 g
  Monounsaturated Fat 6.5 g
  Cholesterol 33.2 mg
  Sodium 1,524.3 mg
  Potassium 486.5 mg
  Total Carbohydrate 21.0 g
  Dietary Fiber 7.3 g
  Sugars 1.6 g
  Protein 13.7 g
  Vitamin A 221.4 %
  Vitamin B-12 13.4 %
  Vitamin B-6 11.6 %
  Vitamin C 57.6 %
  Vitamin D 1.7 %
  Vitamin E 4.2 %
  Calcium 12.5 %
  Copper 15.5 %
  Folate 10.1 %
  Iron 16.2 %
  Magnesium 10.5 %
  Manganese 25.6 %
  Niacin 12.0 %
  Pantothenic Acid     6.6 %
  Phosphorus     15.2 %
  Riboflavin 14.4 %
  Selenium 15.6 %
  Thiamin 14.5 %
  Zinc 10.2 %
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.